Searching for Kingussie Kong: Watch a drone get closer to a fleeing Japanese macaque hiding in the woods after escaping from a Scottish zoo

[ad_1]

The first images of a Japanese snow monkey on the run have been captured, showing the animal wandering through the woods, just 300 meters from the park.

After four days on the run, the primate, nicknamed Kingussie Kong, still managed to escape capture. get out of his enclosure at Highland Wildlife Park, Kingussie, on Sunday morning.

Keepers said the Japanese macaque was slowly approaching the park and although they were able to track it for 45 minutes on Tuesday using drones, they were unable to retrieve it.

Footage of the monkey, also known as the Japanese macaque, has been released, making its way through the undergrowth of Inverness-shire forests, just meters from the park.

A series of images shows the monkey enjoying its wild surroundings. In one, he sits comfortably and looks around, before leisurely strolling further into the trees, while in another he is seen thinking in the deep undergrowth.

The first images of a Japanese snow monkey on the run have been captured, showing the animal wandering through the woods, just 300 meters from the park.

The first images of a Japanese snow monkey on the run have been captured, showing the animal wandering through the woods, just 300 meters from the park.

A series of images shows the monkey enjoying its wild surroundings

A series of images shows the monkey enjoying its wild surroundings

A source from the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, which owns the park, said a drone captured images at the end of its search on Tuesday afternoon, just before nightfall.

He said: “They monitored him for about 45 minutes but they were unable to safely dart the monkey so they chose not to, then the light faded and they had to call off the search for the evening.’

But with a Met Office A yellow warning for strong winds was in place on Wednesday and gusts of up to 85 mph are possible, weather conditions will mean it will not be possible to use drones, although the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) said the search would continue.

Keith Gilchrist, Living Collections Operations Manager at Highland Wildlife Park, said: “Thanks to the continued help of @bhwildlifeconsultancy, we were able to track the macaque for 45 minutes yesterday using drones.

“Unfortunately, he wasn’t in a position where we were confident we could get him safely, but he’s getting closer to the park.”

“Our team will be present again today, but given the strong winds, we will not be able to fly the drones but will use thermal cameras.

“We continue to ask residents to bring any obvious potential food sources, such as bird feeders or food waste, indoors.”

“Although the macaque is not believed to be dangerous to humans or pets, we advise you not to approach it but to contact our hotline on 07933 928377 in the event of a sighting.”

A zoo team is searching for the animal and the public has been warned not to approach it.

A zoo team is searching for the animal and the public has been warned not to approach it.

A source added that there had been an unconfirmed sighting so far this morning, adding: “If that’s accurate, then he’s still close to the park, so fingers crossed he returns there.”

Keepers have also been patrolling the area where the monkey was spotted, but their efforts to capture it so far have paid off.

It is breeding season in the park and the animal is believed to have escaped from its enclosure on Sunday around 7 a.m. after challenging another primate.

Since then there have been numerous sightings, including one of the first in the nearby village of Kincraig, where it was spotted stealing bird feeders in the garden.

Over the four days, however, he was spotted closer to home, with keepers optimistic he was heading home.

The source said: “We don’t know what the macaque homing instinct is, but at its furthest point it was 4km away and now appears to have gone down to 300m from the park, so this suggests that he must have some idea that this is his home.”

The keepers also hoped that when he heard a whistle that they use to attract the troop of macaques at feeding time, he would hear it and it would attract him back into the enclosure.

Staff hope the animal – known for its intelligence – will be able to understand that the fence is only electrified indoors and will be able to return to it safely.

And in case he returned voluntarily, they would do five counts a day instead of the usual two.

Snow monkeys are the world’s northernmost living non-human primate and are well acclimated to subzero temperatures. In the wild, they huddle together for warmth in winter on bedding grounds and bathe in hot springs to keep warm.

Mountain rescue team member Jonny Porteous uses drone to search for fleeing monkey

Mountain rescue team member Jonny Porteous uses drone to search for fleeing monkey

A couple who saw the monkey in their garden this weekend described the experience as “so surreal”.

Carl Nagle, 49, and his partner, Tiina Salzberg, 50, saw the monkey from their patio door in Kincraig, near Kingussie, on Sunday morning.

He nibbled on the nuts in their bird feeder and perched on their backyard fence for about 15 minutes before running off.

Ms Salzberg, director of strategy at a marketing consultancy firm, said: “We were amazed because it is so out of place to see a Japanese snow monkey in your garden in a village in the middle of nowhere.

“It was absolutely wild, we were both nudging each other trying to get out of the way to get the best video and camera angles.

“It was amazing, I’m sure, once in a lifetime.”

Mr Nagle said: “It’s just the most surreal thing, I’ve seen snow monkeys in the wild but you don’t expect to see them in your garden in the Highlands.”

[ad_2]

Source link

Scroll to Top