I’m American and moved to London. Here’s what I HATE about living in the UK… and it’s NOT the weather.

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An American living in London has revealed what she hates about living in the UK – and it’s not the weather.

Aurora Lofton, known on Tic Tac as @aurora._victoriaoften gives her 62,000 followers a glimpse into her new life in Britain.

She has already spoken about our “confusing road signs”, And lack of American snacks‘ at the movies, including popcorn dipped in butter.

The last pet peeve on his list is food shopping and the lifespan of our products.

The video has been viewed by more than 683,000 people and garnered more than 2,600 comments.

An American woman living in London has highlighted what she thinks is one of the hardest things about living in the UK, sparking a new cultural clash.

An American woman living in London has highlighted what she thinks is one of the hardest things about living in the UK, sparking a new cultural clash.

While cutting tomatoes in her kitchen, Aurora explains: “Let me tell you one of the hardest parts about being an American in the UK – and no, it’s not the weather.

“He’s going shopping. So I’m used to the American method, which consists of adding tons of preservatives to our food.

“It’s not so great for you, but it makes life a little easier – the jury’s still out on that here.

“They don’t have as many preservatives in their food, which means when you go to the grocery store, you have to eat that food within two to three days.”

Pointing to her lunch, she added: “For example, these tomatoes that I’m dicing, perfect timing, I got them about three days ago.”

“I’m super excited to eat them with a salad for dinner. This bread, I got this bread at the grocery store the day before I received the tomatoes, so four days ago.

Handing the bread to the camera, she exclaimed: “I literally have mold on my bread after four days.

“It’s crazy to me because now I wasted half a loaf of bread and I hate wasting food.

In a video about eating, she once again compares her lifestyle in the United States to her new lifestyle in London, where she currently resides - and this time it's about shopping and know the lifespan of products.

In a video about eating, she once again compares her lifestyle in the United States to her new lifestyle in London, where she currently resides – and this time it’s about shopping and know the lifespan of products.

“I absolutely hate it, but it’s something that has caused me to be a little more proactive with my shopping because every month I was wasting so much food, so much money.”

“It’s actually been very difficult for me and I’m still working on it.”

The American concludes by advising her fellow expats: “So if you want to move to the UK, make sure you plan your meals out and eat your food quickly, otherwise it will spoil.”

A shocked Brit commented: “Bruh (sic), so you’re telling me American bread doesn’t go bad? Is it plastic?

Others advised: “Freeze the bread, take it out by the slice” and “Put the bread in the refrigerator when you buy it.”

Another joked: “Not great for you but it makes life easier” is the nicest way to sum up the American situation.”

One angry viewer exclaimed: “I’d rather learn how to shop better than be filled with preservatives and other nasty things that Americans put in their food.”

Another American added: “Honestly, as an American, if something doesn’t go wrong after a few days, I stop buying the brand.” Why does my bread last two weeks or more??

Another said: ‘I’m from the UK and have never seen bread go out in 4 days, probably just stored in a warm damp place.’

Meanwhile, an American joked: “But mold after 4 days is not normal. This should last at least a week.

A second wrote: “Here in America. I had a loaf of bread that I left for two weeks and when I returned. No mold.

it comes right after US watchdog told DailyMail.com that the seizure of American candy in the United Kingdom should be a wake-up call to Americans about the contents of their food.

Footage from the UK shows workers putting American candies and sodas – found in virtually every American store – into trash bags as regulators get tougher on American imports.

Candies like Jolly Rancher, Swedish Fish and Lemonhead contain several additives that are legal in the United States but banned by European and British law because of their links to cancer, infertility and other problems.

Watchdog Consumer Reports said the video should spark a change in U.S. food policy and urged U.S. authorities to “do more” to protect adults and children.



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