Absolutely adorable monkey! A western lowland gorilla has been born at London Zoo for the first time in nine years, raising new hopes for the critically endangered species.

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  • The little baby was born to mom Mjukuu at 9:34 a.m. yesterday.
  • Although the baby has not yet been given a name, its birth raises new hopes for the species

London The zoo has a new resident, in the form of an adorable baby western lowland gorilla.

The little baby was born to mom Mjukuu at 9:34 a.m. yesterday, after a quick labor that lasted just 17 minutes.

Although the baby’s name has not yet been named, its birth raises new hopes for the species, currently listed as critically endangered.

“To say we are happy about this new arrival would be an understatement – ​​we all walked with ear to ear smiles,” said Kathryn Sanders, Head of the Primates Section at London Zoo.

“We’re going to give mom and baby plenty of time and space to get to know each other, and the rest of the troop to get used to their new addition – they’re as excited as we are and can’t stop talking to us. look.” to the baby.

London Zoo has a new resident, in the form of an adorable baby western lowland gorilla.  The little baby was born to mom Mjukuu at 9:34 a.m. yesterday, after a quick labor that lasted just 17 minutes.

London Zoo has a new resident, in the form of an adorable baby western lowland gorilla. The little baby was born to mom Mjukuu at 9:34 a.m. yesterday, after a quick labor that lasted just 17 minutes.

While Mjukuu initially kept the baby to herself, she quickly allowed the youngest members of the troupe, Alika and Gernot, to come and meet the newcomer.

While Mjukuu initially kept the baby to herself, she quickly allowed the youngest members of the troupe, Alika and Gernot, to come and meet the newcomer.

The gorilla keepers were going about their usual morning tasks when they first noticed that Mjukuu was giving birth.

“We started our day normally – we gave the gorillas their breakfast and started our cleaning routines,” Ms Sanders said.

“When we returned to their back dens, we could see that Mjukuu was starting to stretch and squat – a sign that she was in labor.

“After a very quick labor – just 17 minutes – Mjukuu was seen on camera tenderly holding her newborn and demonstrating her wonderful maternal instincts – cleaning her baby and checking on him.”

While Mjukuu initially kept the baby to herself, she quickly allowed the youngest members of the troupe, Alika and Gernot, to come and meet the newcomer.

The infant’s father is Kiburi, a male who arrived at London Zoo from Tenerife in November 2022 as part of an international conservation breeding program for western lowland gorillas.

Zookeepers have so far kept their space and therefore do not yet know the sex of the infant.

However, they made sure to keep an eye on the mother and child via CCTV cameras.

Speaking to MailOnline, a London Zoo spokesperson said: “The last baby gorilla born here was a young male named Gernot, in November 2015.

Zookeepers have so far kept their space and therefore do not yet know the sex of the infant.  However, they made sure to keep an eye on the mother and child via CCTV cameras.

Zookeepers have so far kept their space and therefore do not yet know the sex of the infant. However, they made sure to keep an eye on the mother and child via CCTV cameras.

The infant's father is Kiburi, a male who arrived at London Zoo from Tenerife in November 2022 as part of an international conservation breeding program for western lowland gorillas.

The infant’s father is Kiburi, a male who arrived at London Zoo from Tenerife in November 2022 as part of an international conservation breeding program for western lowland gorillas.

“He’s still there – and absolutely fascinated by the newborn.”

The news will be welcomed by conservation experts, who warn that the species’ numbers have fallen in recent years.

The exact number of gorillas is not known because they inhabit some of the densest and most remote tropical forests in Africa.

And while experts say there are “significant populations,” they caution that their high numbers have not protected the western lowland gorilla from decline.

“Due to poaching and disease, gorilla numbers have declined by more than 60 percent over the past 20 to 25 years,” WWF said.

“Even if all threats to western lowland gorillas were removed, scientists estimate that it would take about 75 years for the population to recover.”

HOW MANY WESTERN LOWLAND GORILLAS ARE LEFT IN THE WILD?

The exact number of animals remaining is not known because they inhabit some of Africa’s densest and most isolated tropical rainforests.

However, recent estimates have shown that only 360,000 individuals remain in their range.

Additionally, scientists predict that gorilla numbers have declined by more than 60 percent over the past 20 to 25 years.

The Bristol Zoological Society is involved in a conservation breeding program for western lowland gorillas, which is vitally important to the survival of this critically endangered species.

A family group of seven western lowland gorillas live in Bristol Zoo Gardens, and two baby gorillas have been born there since 2016.



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