A former flight attendant reveals the secret codes the crew uses for passengers they find sexy, annoying, and more… from HOB to VIP (the version that DOES NOT mean you’re important! )

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The next time you’re on a plane and you hear the crew calling you a HOB, take it as a compliment.

But if they call you a VIP, that may not mean they consider you a “very important person.”

This is according to Jay Robert, who worked as a senior cabin crew for Emirates and runs the popular Fly Guy Cabin Crew Lounge Network.

He spoke to MailOnline Travel about some of the secret code words flight attendants use for passengers who they think are sexy, who they find irritating, and more.

Jay said: “When you’re confined to an aircraft for long hours, boredom sets in, leading many crew members to tune into what we call CCFM, or cabin crew radio, to hear the latest hallway gossip.

Former flight attendant Jay Robert spoke to MailOnline Travel about some of the secret code words flight attendants use for passengers they think are hot, find irritating and more.

Former flight attendant Jay Robert spoke to MailOnline Travel about some of the secret code words flight attendants use for passengers they think are hot, find irritating and more.

“In these intriguing whispers on the jump seats, passengers might catch wind of the playful codes that flight attendants use to discreetly describe their passengers as BOB (Best On Board) or PITA (Pain In The Backside).”

Jay’s list comes in part from contacting his Crew Lounge subscribers to discover the codes specific to their crew communities.

He said: “Highlights include ABP – Passenger or able-bodied person. An official code for a passenger (not a crew member) that the crew mentally selects during each flight to assist in an emergency.

“Crew informally use this code to describe a passenger they are attracted to who they believe to be fit and able-bodied.

“BOB can also mean Babe On Board – another flirty abbreviation that some flight attendants will use to tell each other who they secretly have a crush on.

‘SVML means Suddenly Vegetarian Meal, a passenger who didn’t order a special meal and probably isn’t a vegetarian and doesn’t like the meal choice offered, so he suddenly becomes a vegetarian to have something else to eat.

Jay revealed that the crew would use the POS to describe a tall passenger, someone who needs a seat belt extender. And the term “mermaid” is used to refer to “a passenger who lies down on empty seats to prevent others from sitting in their row.”

Jay Robert, who worked as a senior cabin crew for Emirates and runs the popular Fly Guy's Cabin Crew Lounge network

Jay Robert, who worked as a senior cabin crew for Emirates and runs the popular Fly Guy’s Cabin Crew Lounge network

And what about the aforementioned HOBs and VIPs?

They mean Hotty On Board and the latter can mean Very Irritating Person.

Jay explained that cabin crew also use serious acronyms called Special Services Request (SSR) codes.

When you’re confined to a plane for long hours, boredom sets in, leading many crew members to tune into what we call CCFM, or cabin crew radio, for the latest gossip corridors.

Jay Robert, former Emirates flight attendant

He said: “Specific SSR codes provide a discreet way for airline staff to handle sensitive situations regarding passenger privacy.

“For example, when a person is deported, ground staff can use the DEPA or DEPU codes to discreetly communicate this information to the crew during boarding, thus avoiding having to openly declare: ‘This passenger is being evicted. »

A related code is INAD, which refers to a person who has been refused entry into a country.

Jay continued: “Other common SSR codes you might hear used on an airplane are UM (a child traveling alone), MEDA (a medical case), DPAX (disruptive passenger), DND (Do not disturb), EBL ( Eat Before Landing) and CIP – to signify that a person is of commercial importance to the airline.

And if someone calls you SFU, prepare to let the less busy times pass, because that, Jay revealed, means Suitable for Upgrading.

To learn more about Jay, visit www.instagram.com/aflyguytravels And www.facebook.com/aflyguyslounge.



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